Freshman Seminar 101 - Economics in an Ethical World - Winter 2003

2004 FINAL

Description: 

This freshman seminar will examine real and imagined tensions between economic and ethical goals.  For example, must we sacrifice economic growth in order to protect the environment?  Can we improve our standard of living without diminishing that of future generations?  Can businesses compete in the global marketplace while operating within reasonable moral guidelines?  These and related dilemmas will be discussed with an eye toward optimal personal and social policymaking.  Prerequisite: None

Requirements:  

Attendance at all class sessions is required, with exceptions granted according to Centre College policy.  Skipping class will lower your participation grade by 1 point for each hour missed.  Grades will be based on participation, homework, and a short paper.  If you are contributing to each class discussion, you can assume that your participation grade is intact unless I notify you to the contrary.  If you miss class time, it is your responsibility to obtain notes from your classmates about the lecture, discussion, and assignments.  The following weights will be applied to the course requirements:

                                    Participation/Debates                        40%
                                   
Homework/Electronic Journal           30%
                                   
Test                                                     30%

The reading will be from Nickel and Dimed, The Age of Environmentalism, and a few handouts and web pages.  Please read the footnotes in Nickel and Dimed as well.

You will write at least two full pages in your electronic journal each day (double spaced, font size 12, 1 inch margins).  Bring the pages to class each day to refer to in our discussions and I will collect them at the end of each class.  On days when we don't have class you may e-mail the pages to me by 4:00 p.m.

Date

Activities/Discussion

Location

Advance Reading

Writing due

1/6

Check-ins, plan debates, Roger and Me, travel/prison forms

Y102

none

 

1/7

Field Trip-- ASPI 9:15 a.m. – 3:00 p.m., dress warmly

Van between Sutcliff and Crounse

Nickel and Dimed pp. 1-49.

Reaction to N/D

Response to Roger, 

1/8

Meet with debate/presentation groups

Your call

Nickel and Dimed  pp. 51-85

Reaction to N/D

 

1/9

DEBATE I

Presentation I:  Multi-level marketing

Y102

Nickel and Dimed pp. 86-119

Reaction to N/D

Issues with MLM

1/10

The Big One movie, discuss sweat shops

3:15 Mike Kretz 859-269-2203

Y102

Nickel and Dimed pp. 121-155

Krugman, Web on Sweatshops

Reaction to N/D

Views on Sweatshops

1/13

Field Trip— Prison 1-4

Van between Sutcliff and Crounse

Nickel and Dimed pp. 156-191

Reaction to N/D

 

1/14

Ethics Lecture

Affluenza movie, discussion

Y102

Nickel and Dimed pp. 193-221 Materialism reading

 

Reaction to N/D

What is the source of materialism?

How do we bring about ethical behavior?

1/15

Meet with debate groups

Your Call

de S pp. 1-28

Reaction to de S

 

1/16

Field Trip to Poverty, Farm 1-4

Y102

de S pp. 29-59

Corruption reading

 

Reaction to de S

Costs and benefits of income inequality

What is the best cure for corruption?

1/17

DEBATE II

Presentation II:  McLibel

Y102

 

 

1/20

Cancer Alley movie, discussion

Y102

de S pp. 60-90

Environment reading

Reaction to de S

How do we draw the line re: conservation?

1/21

Reading/Writing Day, no class

 

de S pp. 91-115

Reaction to de S

1/22

Field Trip     7:40-10:30 a.m.

Small Business Ethics, Hampton Inn

Van between Sutcliff and Crounse

Ethics reading

Questions for Business Owners

1/23

Silent Spring movie, discussion

Y102

de S pp. 116-138

Regulations reading

What role should regulations play?

1/24

Measures of Economic Growth and “Green” Growth, closing discussions

Y102

de S pp. 139-166

Web pages for and against MLM

List of 12 sustainable sources of employment

1/27

Test

Y102

 

 

 

ECO 110 - INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS

Description:  An introduction to economic theory and applications.  We will construct simple economic models of human behavior, production, pricing, distribution, monetary theory, and the business cycle.  Prerequisites:  none.

Requirements:  Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, two in-class “learning celebrations” (a.k.a. exams), and a final learning celebration.  Attendance at all class sessions is required, with exceptions granted according to Centre College policy.  Skipping class will lower your participation grade by 1 point out of 10 each time, although failing grades will not be given based on truancy alone.  I will drop your lowest/first-missed quiz.  A second missed quiz score can be replaced with the grade on an original, 2-page essay on the topic missed if handed in the following class period.  Subsequent missed quizzes will go down as zeros.  The weights and grading scale are as follows:

Participation

10% 

Homework / Quizzes

20% 

Learning Celebration I

20%  

Learning Celebration II

20% 

Final Learning Celebration

30% 

 

93-100 A
90-93 A-
87-90 B+
83-87 B
80-83 B-
... ...

Reading Materials:  Economics, 5th edition by Roger Arnold; Favorite Ways to Learn Economics

Quizzes:  Each Tuesday.  See the notes on the following page for more information.

Reflections:  Please bring the completed reflections to class the day following the associated experiment for the purpose of discussion.  I will ask you about them but you don’t need to turn them in.

Problem Sets:  Do these on your own.  If you score below a 5 on a quiz, you must hand in the homework set for the chapter covered on the quiz day.  You will receive your quiz back on Thursday and the homework will be due the following Tuesday.  Your “low” quiz score will then be changed to the average of the quiz score and the homework score.  Remember that this work is a reflection of you.  Sloppy or unstapled work will receive a 10% deduction.  Illegible work will be market incorrect.  Late problem sets will receive a deduction of 20% per day.

I am always trying to find ways to help everyone in my classes get A’s.  (In fact, sometimes they all do.)  It is clear to me that anyone who follows these steps can earn the grade they want:

1)                  Complete the reading assignments carefully before class.  Take your time--don’t just skim.

2)                  Take notes on the text summarizing important concepts in your own words and drawing all the graphs.

3)                  Attend every class meeting and take good notes in class.

4)                  Ask questions in class about anything you don’t understand.

5)                  Work the problem sets without reliance on others or on an answer guide.

6)                  Work with your classmates/friends on any rough spots.

7)                  Visit office hours to iron out any remaining confusion.

Date

Chapter / Experiment / Homework

Topic

Sept.3

None / 1A, discuss 9B, film/none due

Learning Tips, Allocation of Resources

5

1, Appendix / 2A / hand in schedule

Intro to Economics / Working with Diagrams

10

2 / 1B / quiz

Trade and Tradeoffs

12

3 / 2B

Supply and Demand

17

4 / 3 A & B / quiz

Applications of Supply and Demand

19

5 / 8 A & B /

Prices and Unemployment

24

6 / 11A / quiz

GDP

26

7 / paper on 3 study methods due

Aggregate Supply and Demand

October 1

Catch up / Family Feud / quiz on Ch. 7

Review

3

Learning Celebration I click here for old exam

click here for 2011 1st exam

Chapters 1 – 7

8

8 & 9 / quiz on Ch. 8 & 9 reading

Self Regulation of the Economy

10

10

Fiscal Policy

15

12 / 10A&B/ quiz w/ no hw incentive

Money and Banking

22

15 / 12A / quiz

Monetary Policy

24

18 / 7A

Elasticity

29

19 / 7B / Ch. 18 Homework
click here for assignment

Consumer Choice

31

Catch up

Review

Nov. 5

Learning Celebration II click here for old exam

Material since 1st Celebration

7

19 & Appendix / go over exam

Budget Constraints and Indifference Curves

12

21 / 11B / Ch. 19 problems due (from chapter and appendix)

Production and Costs

14

22 / 12B

Perfect Competition

19

23 / 5B / Ch. 21 & 22 problems due

Monopoly

21

27 / 6 A & B

Factor Markets

26

Reading Day – no class

Read, Practice, Learn

Dec. 3

31 / 4 A & B / Ch. 23 & 27 problems due

Market Failure

5

Catch up

Review

13(a)/9(b)

Final Learning Celebration 
click here for old exam

c
lick for more problems

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m., Comprehensive

The numbers on the left side of the middle column are the chapter to be read in the Economics textbook.  Read them before the class for which they are assigned. 

After the first "/" there is a chapter number and a letter.  These indicate the experiment from the "Favorite Ways" book that we will do IN CLASS on that day.  For example, on the first day we’ll do 1A, which is the first experiment in chapter one.  On the second day we’ll do 2A, which is the first experiment in chapter two.  1B means Chapter 1, second experiment, and so on.  Read the introduction and scenario prior to class.  Sometimes there will be some other preparation mentioned in those sections.  As indicated in the book, do not complete the “reflections” until after we do the experiment in class.  We will discuss your answers to the reflections the day after the experiment, but you do not need to hand the reflections in.

After the second "/" there are sometimes homework assignments or quizzes.  Quizzes will be on the homework problems at the end of the chapter assigned for the previous day and the reading for the chapter assigned for that day.  For example, On Sept. 10 the quiz will be a problem or two from textbook problems at the end of Chapter 1 and a problem or two asking about the material you read for Chapter 2.  If you earn a 5 or higher out of 10 on the quiz, you don’t need to hand in the homework problems.  If you earn a 4 or below, you will need to hand in the homework set for the chapter assigned on the day of the quiz.  Exam questions will come mostly from problems in the textbook and in the Favorite Ways bood.  Please let me know if anything is unclear.  Thanks.

ECO 150/350a - DISPUTE RESOLUTION - Winter 1999

Description: A study of past, present, and future methods of resolving disputes over facts, rights, and decisions. The economist’s tools of theoretical and empirical analysis are applied to prospective dispute resolution techniques to determine their viability. The procedures discussed are useful in negotiations over everything from wages and prices to where to go for dinner.

Requirements: Attendance at all class sessions is required, with exceptions granted according to Centre College policy. Skipping class will lower your participation grade by 1 point (out of 10) each time, although failing grades will not be given based on truancy alone. Grades will be based on participation, two tests, homework, and a final. If you are contributing to class discussions every day, you can assume that your participation grade is intact unless I notify you to the contrary. Quizzes cannot be made up, but your lowest quiz or homework grade will be dropped. Late homework will receive a deduction of 20% per day. The following weights will be applied to the course requirements:

Participation                 15%
Homework                    15%
Test I                             20%
Test II                            20%
Paper (ECO 35 only)   10%
Final                               20/30%

ECO 15 students will not be responsible for symbolic models on quizzes or tests.

Textbooks:
Anderson, David A. (ed.). 1996. Dispute Resolution: Bridging the Settlement Gap (Greenwich: JAI Press).

Ury, William and Roger Fisher. 1991. Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In. (New York: Penguin).

(Additional readings may be assigned.)

For ECO 35 students, the paper will consist of 6-8 original pages.  It cannot overlap with anything you or anyone else has written.  Topics will be discussed in class.

Class Topic Reading
Jan. 4  Introduction to Dispute Resolution  
Jan. 5  Bargaining Over Positions   Ury & Fisher, Ch. 1
Jan. 7, 8   Settlement and Fair Division   Anderson, Ch. 1
Jan. 11   The People and the Problem  Ury & Fisher, Ch. 2
Jan. 12  Field Trip ?  
Jan. 14  Case Selection & Trial / Settlement Decisions  Anderson, Ch. 2
Jan. 15  Focus on Interests   Ury & Fisher, Ch. 3
Jan. 18   Learning Motivator I Click for old exam  
Jan. 19  Finding Options for Mutual Gain  Ury & Fisher, Ch. 4
Jan. 21  Bargaining Impediments and Settlement  Anderson, Ch. 3
Jan. 22  Film / Discussion  
Jan. 25  Using Objective Criteria  Ury & Fisher, Ch. 5
Jan. 26  Empirical Research on Settlement Devices  Anderson, Ch. 6 
Jan. 28   Bargaining Power and the Bottom Line   Ury & Fisher, Ch. 6 
Jan. 29  Learning Motivator II  Click here to see old exam  
Feb. 1  Enticing Negotiation  Ury & Fisher, Ch. 7 
Feb. 2  The Structure of the Legal Bargaining Game  Anderson, Ch. 7
Feb. 4   Avoiding Dirty Tricks   Ury & Fisher, Ch. 8 
Feb. 5  Guest Speaker / Papers Due (ECO 35 only)   
Feb. 8   The Dawning of Arbitration   Anderson, Ch. 9 
Feb. 9   Alternative Dispute Resolution   Anderson, Ch. 10 
Feb. 11   Economics of Crime / Review   
Feb. 12  Final Learning Motivator  Old Exam 1:30 - 3:30 am

  Crime Deterrence PowerPoint 2009

ECO 220 – MICROECONOMIC ANALYSIS

Description: An investigation of the economic factors determining consumer behavior, production, pricing, and market structures in a partial equilibrium framework. Theories of distribution, welfare criteria, and general equilibrium are examined. Prerequisites: ECO 11 and MAT 12.

Requirements: Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, two in-class exams, and a final exam. Attendance at all class sessions is required, with exceptions granted according to Centre College policy. Skipping class will lower your participation grade by 1 point out of 10 each time, although failing grades will not be given based on truancy alone. I will drop your lowest/first-missed quiz. A second missed quiz score can be replaced with the grade on an original, 2-page essay on the topic missed if handed in the following class period. Subsequent missed quizzes will go down as zeros. The weights and grading scale are as follows:

Participation 10%
Homework / Quizzes 15%
Exam 1 20%
Exam 2 25%
Final Exam 30%

 

93-100 A
90-93 A-
87-90 B+
83-87 B
80-83 B-
... ...

Textbook: Browning and Zupan, Microeconomic Theory and Applications, 5th Edition.

I am always trying to find ways to help everyone in my classes achieve their academic goals. It is clear to me that anyone who follows these steps can earn the grade they want:

  1. Read the book carefully.
  2. Summarize important concepts in your own words (a minimum of 3 pages per chapter not including graphs) and draw all the graphs.
  3. Take good notes in class.
  4. Ask questions in class about anything you don’t understand.
  5. Work the problem sets without reliance on others or on an answer guide.
  6. Work with your classmates/friends on any rough spots.
  7. Visit office hours to iron out any remaining confusion.

 

Class Period

Reading Topic Effort
September 3 Chapter 1 Introduction  
8 Chapter 2 Supply and Demand  
10 Chapter 3 Consumer Choice  
15 Chapter 4 Individual and Market Demand  
17 Chapter 5 Using Consumer Choice Theory  
22 Chapter 5 Using Consumer Choice Theory  
24   Review  
29 Learning Motivator
(Click for Old Exam)

Click here for Calculus Review Sheet

Chapters 1 - 5  
October 1 Chapter 6 Production  
6 Chapter 6 Production  
8 Chapter 7 Production Costs  
15 Chapter 8 Profit Max & Competition  
20 Chapter 9 Using the Competitive Model  
22 Chapter 10 Monopoly  
27 Chapter 10 Review  
29 Learning Motivator II
(Click for Old Exam)
Chapters 6 - 10  
November 3 Chapter 12 Oligopoly  
5 Chapter 12 Oligopoly  
12 Chapter 13 Game Theory & Information  
17 Chapter 15 Employment & Inputs  
19 Chapter 16 Wages & Rents  
24 Chapter 17 Applications  
December 1 Chapter 19 Public Goods & Externalities  
December 3 Review    
December 8 Final 8:30 – 11:30 am
New Improved Practice Final
Comprehensive  

 

ECO 320 – LABOR ECONOMICS - Fall 1998
Tuesday / Thursday 2:20 – 3:50 a.m. – Olin 123

 

Description: Economic and social forces determining the character and utilzation of human resources in a market economy. Topics include labor supply, labor demand, collective bargaining, mobility, human capital, unemployment, technological changes, and wage rates. Prerequisite: ECO 11.

Requirements: Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, two in-class exams, and a final exam. Attendance at all class sessions is required, with exceptions granted according to Centre College policy. Skipping class will lower your participation grade by 1 point out of 10 each time, although failing grades will not be given based on truancy alone. I will drop your lowest/first-missed quiz. A second missed quiz score can be replaced with the grade on an original, 2-page essay on the topic missed if handed in the following class period. Subsequent missed quizzes will go down as zeros. The weights and grading scale are as follows:

Participation 10%
Homework / Quizzes 15%
Exam 1 20%
Exam 2 25%
Final Exam 30%

 

93-100 A
90-93 A-
87-90 B+
83-87 B
80-83 B-
... ...

Textbook: Kaufman, The Economics of Labor Markets, 4th Edition.

I am always trying to find ways to help everyone in my classes get A’s. It is clear to me that anyone who follows these steps can earn the grade they want:

  1. Read the book carefully.
  2. Summarize important concepts in your own words and draw all the graphs.
  3. Take good notes in class.
  4. Ask questions in class about anything you don’t understand.
  5. Work the problem sets without reliance on others or on an answer guide.
  6. Work with your classmates/friends on any rough spots.
  7. Visit office hours to iron out any remaining confusion.

Class Period

Reading Topic Effort

September 3

Chapter 1 The Labor Market  

8

Chapter 1 The Labor Market  

10

Chapter 2 Hours of Work  

15

Chapter 2 Hours of Work  

17

Chapter 3 Labor Force Participation  

22

Chapter 3 Labor Force Participation  

24

Learning Motivator
(Click for Old Exam)
Chapters 1-3  

29

Chapter 4 The Demand for Labor  

October 1

Chapter 4 The Demand for Labor  

6

Chapter 6 The Determinants of Wages  

8

Chapter 6 The Determinants of Wages  

15

Chapter 7 Education, Training, Human K  

20

Chapter 7 Education, Training, Human K  

22

Chapter 8 Occupational Wage Differentials  

27

Chapter 8 Occupational Wage Differentials  

29

Learning Motivator II 
 (Click for Old Exam)
Chapters 4-8  

November 3

Chapter 9 Discrimination  

5

Chapter 9 Discrimination  

12

Chapter 10 Unions & Collective Bargaining  

17

Chapter 10 Unions & Collective Bargaining  

19

Chapter 13 Unemployment  

24

Chapter 13 Unemployment  

December 1

Chapter 14 Poverty and Income Distribution  

3

Review Poverty and Income Distribution  

10

Final Learning Motivator  
(Click for Old Exam)
1:30 - 4:30 p.m. Comprehensive  

 

ECO 350 - LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS

Description:  A study of the legal, ethical, and global environment of business. Topics include the sources of American law, the workings of the judicial system, business ethics and social responsibility, product liability, deceptive trade practices, international law, and environmental regulation. Prerequisites: ECO 11, ECO 22 or permission of the instructor.

 

ECO 355  -  ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS  -  Fall 2003

Description:    This course applies economic theory to the major environmental issues of our time.  Topics include the evaluation of environmental policy, the management of natural resources, determinants of resource depletion, sustainable development, and the optimal level of biodiversity.  We will use the tools of economics to identify weighty problems and find the most efficient solutions.  Prerequisite: ECO 110.

Requirements:  Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, and three learning celebrations (a.k.a. exams).  Attendance at all class sessions is required, with exceptions granted according to Centre College policy.  Skipping class will lower your participation grade by 1 point (out of 10) each time, although failing grades will not be given based on truancy alone.  If you are contributing to class discussions daily, you can assume that your participation grade is intact unless I notify you to the contrary.  I will drop your first missed quiz.  If you don’t miss any quizzes, I will drop your lowest quiz or homework grade.  A second missed quiz score can be replaced with the grade on an original, 2-page essay on the topic missed.  Subsequent missed quizzes will go down as zeros.  Late homework will receive a deduction of 20% per day.  The following weights will be applied to the course requirements:

      

Attendance / Participation 10%
Homework / Quizzes 20%
Midterm I  20% 
Midterm II 20%
Final Exam 30%

 

93-100 A
90-93 A-
87-90 B+
83-87 B
80-83 B-
... ...

 

Textbook:  Anderson, Environmental Economics and Natural Resource Management.

Homework:  As long as the class test average remains above 80%, you do not need to hand in the homework problems.  However, you should work these problems, as similar or identical questions will appear on the tests.  To further assist you in the battle against evil and temptation, we will have pop quizzes on the reading material and chapter problems.

Writing assignment:  On the first day that we cover each chapter (excluding Ch. 1), please bring a 1-2 page (double-spaced, 1 inch margin, 12 pt times roman) set of reflections on the chapter that include one or more paragraphs answering each of the following questions:  (1) What did you find the most interesting and why?  (2) What did you agree or disagree with the most strongly and why?  (3) What issue is the most important to your present or future life and why?  (4)  What specific questions do you have?  Please label the first paragraph about each topic with the number of that topic provided here (1, 2, 3, or 4).

Your presentation will be on the environmental economics controversy of your choice.  You will have 10-12 minutes to address the strongest arguments on both sides, and to defend your chosen side.  Please refer to at least 3 articles from economics journals on an environmental economics topic of your choice.  You should include some form of visual aid (the chalkboard, PowerPoint, posters, creatures, …).  The grade on this will be part of your homework grade.

Date

Chapter

Topic

September 9

1

The Big Picture

11

2

Efficiency and Choice

16

2

Field Trip – Agriculture Issues

18

3

Market Failure

23

4

Trade-offs and the Economy

25

5

Morals and Motivation

30

(nothing new)

Review, discuss paper topics

October 2

Learning Celebration
click for old exam

Chapters 1-5

7

6

Environmental Quality / Field Trip

9

6

Corp Recycling Field Trip

14

7

Energy / Movie in Bijou

16

7

Discussion

21

8

Sustainability / Kevin Doyle

28

9

Biodiversity and Valuation

30

10

International and Global Issues

November 4

(nothing new)

Review / Catch-up

6

Learning Celebration 
click for old exam

Chapters 6-10

11

11

Renewable Resources

13

11

Conservation Easements

18

12

Depl/Replenishable Resources

20

13

Role of Gov. / Presentations

25

Presentations

Day 2 of Presentations

December 2

14

Environmental Policy

4

15

Population, Poverty, Growth

9

16

Dispute Resolution

11

(nothing new)

Review Session

19

Final 8:30 – 11:30 am
click for old exam

Comprehensive

 

 

ECO 350 - GAME THEORY

Description:  A theoretical analysis of strategy and design for primarily non-cooperative games with applications to voting, bargaining, business tactics, legal disputes, auctions, cost allocation, and trading. Prerequisites: ECO 11, MAT 14.

 

ECO 350 - ECONOMICS OF CRIME

Description:  Course participants will use an economic approach to understand criminal behavior and evaluate various public policies designed to deter it. Discussion topics will include the impact of criminal activity, the optimum allocation of criminal justice resources, the markets for heroin and cocaine, and organized crime. Prerequisite: Economics 11.

INS 450A - LAW AND ECONOMICS

Description:  An introduction to the analysis of legal issues and legal reasoning. Case studies in tort law, product liability, and the value of life. Other topics include dispute resolution, contracts, property, affirmative action, civil procedure, and the economics of criminal behavior.

ECO 390 - QUANTITATIVE METHODS -  Spring 2000
TTh 8:00 - 9:30 A.M., Olin 122
 

Description:  Applied quantitative methods for economics, business, and the social sciences.  Topics include systems of equations, derivative and integral calculus, matrix algebra, probability theory, statistical inference, and the mathematics of finance.  Prerequisites:  ECO 22; MAT 14.

 Requirements:  Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, two midterms, and a final exam.  Attendance is required.  Skipping class will lower your attendance / participation grade by one point (out of 10) each time, although failing grades will not be granted based on truancy alone.  If you are contributing to class discussions every week, you can assume that your participation grade is intact unless I notify you to the contrary.  Grades on late homework will be decreased by 20% per day past due.  The following weights will be applied to the course requirements:

Attendance / Participation 10%
Homework / Quizzes 20%
Midterm I  20% 
Midterm II 20%
Final Exam 30%

                                                        

93-100 A
90-93 A-
87-90 B+
83-87 B
80-83 B-
... ...

Textbook:  Prichett and Saber, Mathematics with Applications in Management and Economics (seventh edition). 

In this age, which believes that there is a short cut to everything, the greatest lesson to be learned is that the most difficult way is, in the long run, the easiest.

Henry Miller (1891–1980), U.S. author. The Books in My Life, Preface (1951).

 

Class Period

Reading

Topic

Feb. 17, 22

Chapter 1

Linear Equations and Functions

Feb. 24, 29, Mar. 2 Chapter 2  Systems of Equations and Matrices

March 7, 9, 14

Chapter 6

Mathematics of Finance / Review

March 16

Midterm I
(Click here for old exam)

Chapters 1, 2, 6

March 21, 23

Chapter 7

Introduction to Differential Calculus

March 28, April 11

Chapter 8

Applications of Differential Calculus

April 13, 20

Chapter 9

Topics in Diff. Calculus / Review

April 25

Midterm II 
(Click here for old exam)

Chapters 7 - 9

April 27, May 2

Chapter 10

Introduction to Integrals

May 4, 9

Chapter 11

Counting and Probability

May 11, 16

Chapter 12

Probability Distributions

May 18 (study day)

Optional review

Anything goes

May 24

Final  - 8:30 - 11:30 a.m.
(Click here for old exam)

Cumulative

ECO 480 - INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION

Description:  A theoretical and empirical analysis of the structure of industrial markets and the behavior of business firms in competitive and noncompetitive markets. We will also consider legal restrictions on business policy, and social and political implications of government regulation of private enterprises.

ECO 490 - ECONOMETRICS

Description:  A study of the regression and correlation methods used to test economic hypotheses using empirical observations. Bivariate and multivariate models are discussed. Special topics include multicollinearity, serial correlation, specification error, and heteroskedasticity. An introduction to simultaneous equation systems is included. Prerequisite: ECO 39.

 

ECO 500 - SENIOR SEMINAR - SPRING 1999

T,TH 2:20 - 3:50 Olin 108

Dr. David A. Anderson
114 Doherty (enter side door of library, go down)
Office Hours: T,Th 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. (or by appointment)
Phone: 238-5282

Description:

This Senior Seminar is intended to round out the Centre economics experience with opportunities to polish skills in research, writing, job-attainment, and verbal expression. The course will depart from the more traditional, passive paradigm in which an instructor identifies what s/he feels is important and provides information to demystify the topic in question. In this transitional course, YOU are encouraged to identify important questions, seek answers aggressively and resourcefully, and disseminate credible results. In addition to work on original research, each student will be asked to read and discuss several seminal articles in the field of economics.

Requirements:

Grades will be based on attendance and participation, homework assignments, presentations, and three exams. Attendance at all class sessions is required, with exceptions granted according to Centre College policy.  Skipping class will lower your attendance / participation grade by 1 point (out of 10) each time, although failing grades will not be given based on truancy alone. The following weights will be applied to the course requirements:

Presentations / Debates (4) 30%
Exams (3) 30%
Paper 25%
Attendance / Participation 10%
Other Assignments 5%

 

93-100 A
90-93 A-
87-90 B+
83-87 B
80-83 B- (and so on)

Readings:

Coase, Ronald H. 1960. "The Problem of Social Cost," Journal of Law & Economics 3(2) pp. 1-45.

Anderson, David A. 1999. "The Aggregate Burden of Crime," Journal of Law & Economics, 42(2) (I will provide copies of this).

Friedman, Milton. "Wage Determination and Unemployment," (Ch. 12) Price Theory (Chicago: University of Chicago Press) pp. 213-237.

Akerlof, George. 1970. "The Market for Lemons: Quality Uncertainty and the Market Mechanism," Quarterly Journal of Economics, 84(3) pp. 488-500.

Viscusi, W. Kip. 1993. "The Value of Risks to Life and Health," Journal of Economic Literature 31(4) pp. 1912-1946.

Becker, Gary S. 1993. "Nobel Lecture: The Economic Way of Looking at Behavior," Journal of Political Economy 101(3) pp. 385-409.
   

Class Period Reading/Topic 
Assignment
Location
February 18 Intro, Brainstorm Questions and Resources 
Classroom
23 Answer Contest  
Bring 5 writing questions
 My Office
25 About Writing and Research  
Bring assigned answers
Classroom
March 2 Presentations / Mock Interviews  
4 Presentations / Mock Interviews  
9 Presentations / Mock Interviews  
11 Presentations / Mock Interviews  
16 Reading Day (use it well!) Your Choice
18 First Learning Motivator  
click to see old exam
 Classroom
23 Topic Round Table 
Outline and two page introduction due
 Classroom
25 Debate–  
30 Debate -  
April 1 Debate -  
13 Learning New Software 
Rough draft of 1st 8 pages of paper due
Computer Lab
15 Paper Conferences  My Office
20 Debate -  
22 Debate -  
27 Second Learning Motivator 
click to see old exam
Classroom
29 Job Skills  Classroom
May 4 Paper Presentations  
6 Paper Presentations  
11 Paper Presentations  
13  Paper Presentations  
18 Take Home Exam Distributed 
Papers Due      click to see old exam
 Classroom
21 Exams Due 4:30 p.m. My Office