Course Offerings | Humanities

Division of Humanities

Jane Joyce (chair), Brian Cooney, Ruben Dupertuis, Helen Emmitt, Tony Haigh, Barbara Hall, Ken Keffer, Werner Klimke, William Levin, Mark Lucas, Daniel Manheim, Thomas McCollough, Jennifer McMahon, James Morrison, Mark Rasmussen, Milton Reigelman, Tammy Thompson, Marianne Ward, Philip White



No major or minor is offered in this program, but elective courses in humanities are offered from time to time on a variety of topics. HUM 110 or 111 and 120 or 121 are required for graduation and are normally taken in the freshman year.



Humanities Courses

HUM 110 Introduction to Humanities-I
A study of literature, philosophy, and the fine arts in classical Greek and Roman civilization with special attention given to ethical and aesthetic values. Emphasis is placed on writing, analysis, and discussion.

HUM 111 Expository Writing and Humanities-I (four credit hours)
A variant of HUM 110 designed to provide additional instruction and practice in all forms of expository writing.

HUM 120 Introduction to Humanities-II
A selected study of literature, music, and the fine arts from the medieval period onward, with special attention given to ethical and aesthetic values. Emphasis is placed on writing, analysis, and discussion. Prerequisite: HUM 110 or 111.

HUM 121 Expository Writing and Humanities-II (four credit hours)
A variant of HUM 120 designed to provide additional instruction and practice in all forms of expository writing. A passing grade in this course satisfies the basic skills requirement in expository writing. Prerequisite: HUM 110 or 111.


Special Topics Offered 2001-2002

HUM 250 The Culture of Alsace
An intensive immersion in the history, art, architecture, traditions, and natural environment of the Rhine plain. Survival language skills and an orientation to Strasbourg are included. A journal is required. Offered in Strasbourg. (Offered on a Pass/Unsatisfactory basis only.)

HUM 252 The Culture of Renaissance Europe
This interdisciplinary course will focus on the art, architecture, music and dance of the Renaissance period in Europe. A goal will be to arrive at an understanding of how accurate the term "renaissance" (rebirth) is for the cultural developments and humanistic worldview that emerged in the 16th century. Visits to art museums, churches, and concerts in the area and in Washington, D.C. will complement performance and art activities on campus.