Course Offerings | Humanities

Division of Humanities

Jane Joyce (chair), Robert Colter, Mary Daniels , Ruben Dupertuis, Tammy Durant, Helen Emmitt, Anthony Haigh, Barbara Hall, William Levin, William Lewis, Janet Link, Mark Lucas, Jennifer McMahon, James Morrison, Mark Rasmussen, Sarah Stoycos, Marianne Ward, Vessela Warner, Philip White



No major or minor is offered in this program, but elective courses in humanities are offered from time to time on a variety of topics. HUM 110 or 111 and 120 or 121 are required for graduation and are normally taken in the freshman year.



Humanities Courses

HUM 110 Introduction to Humanities-I
A study of literature, philosophy, and the fine arts in classical Greek and Roman civilization with special attention given to ethical and aesthetic values. Emphasis is placed on writing, analysis, and discussion.

HUM 111 Expository Writing and Humanities-I (four credit hours)
A variant of HUM 110 designed to provide additional instruction and practice in all forms of expository writing.

HUM 120 Introduction to Humanities-II
A selected study of literature, music, and the fine arts from the medieval period onward, with special attention given to ethical and aesthetic values. Emphasis is placed on writing, analysis, and discussion. Prerequisite: HUM 110 or 111.

HUM 121 Expository Writing and Humanities-II (four credit hours)
A variant of HUM 120 designed to provide additional instruction and practice in all forms of expository writing. A passing grade in this course satisfies the basic skills requirement in expository writing. Prerequisite: HUM 110 or 111.


Special Topics Offered 2002-2003

HUM 259 From De Gaulle to Chirac: The History of Modern France
A study of the evolution of France since the end of World War II, examining the political, economical, sociological and artistic changes that affected France in the second half of the 20th century. Conducted in Strasbourg.

GER 325/HUM 264 German Film: Monsters, Tramps, Refugees and Punks
A survey of German-language cinema emphasizing the early black-and-white films of the Weimar period (1919-33), the highly influential art films of the “New German Cinema?(ca. 1965-85) and the (superficially) lighter German films made after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. Emphasis on understanding films in their social, cultural and historical contexts and on understanding the fundamentals of film art, analysis and criticism. Films will be screened in the evenings and will be available on reserve in the library. Films subtitled in English, general discussions in English. GER 325 students have additional readings and a separate hour of discussion in German, with all papers and exams in German. Prerequisite: None for HUM 264; GER 220 or placement for GER 325.

HUM 267 Elsa?/strong>
, Alsace or Elsass: Forming a Modern Alsatian Identity
An introduction to the region of Alsace within the greater context of France and, to a lesser extent, that of modern Europe. Students spend three weeks exploring and studying Alsatian culture: its history, art and architecture, language, cuisine, geography, demographics, and politics. Conducted in Strasbourg.



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