Course Offerings | Humanities

Division of Humanities

Helen Emmitt (chair), Robert Colter, Steve Froehlich, Joan Haigh, Anthony Haigh, Jane Joyce, John Kinkade, William Levin, Nathan Link, Mark Lucas, Dan Manheim, Heather Morton, Lee Patterson, Mark Rasmussen, Vessela Warner, Philip White, Lisa Williams, Ian Wilson



No major or minor is offered in this program, but elective courses in humanities are offered from time to time on a variety of topics. HUM 110 or 111 and 120 or 121 are required for graduation and are normally taken in the freshman year.



Humanities Courses

HUM 110 Introduction to Humanities-I
A study of literature, philosophy, and the fine arts in classical Greek and Roman civilization with special attention given to ethical and aesthetic values. Emphasis is placed on writing, analysis, and discussion.

HUM 111 Expository Writing and Humanities-I (four credit hours)
A variant of HUM 110 designed to provide additional instruction and practice in all forms of expository writing.

HUM 120 Introduction to Humanities-II
A selected study of literature, music, and the fine arts from the medieval period onward, with special attention given to ethical and aesthetic values. Emphasis is placed on writing, analysis, and discussion. Prerequisite: HUM 110 or 111.

HUM 121 Expository Writing and Humanities-II (four credit hours)
A variant of HUM 120 designed to provide additional instruction and practice in all forms of expository writing. A passing grade in this course satisfies the basic skills requirement in expository writing. Prerequisite: HUM 110 or 111.


Special Topics Offered 2005-2006

HUM 258 Life in Merida
Experiential learning through community projects and language and culture immersion, as encountered in Merida, Mexico, as well as trips outside Merida. In-class lecture, discussion, film viewings, and readings on such diverse topics as the Conquest, the Mexican Corrido, New World realities as reflected in the Latin American short story, and the history of the Yucatan Peninsula.

HUM 269 Elsaß, Alsace or Elsass: Forming a Modern Alsatian Identity

An introduction to the region of Alsace within the greater context of France and, to a lesser extent, that of modern Europe. Students spend three weeks exploring and studying Alsatian
culture: its history, art and architecture, language, cuisine, geography, demographics, and politics. Conducted in Strasbourg.

HUM 270 Balkan Crossroads: The Bulgarian & Greek Models
The course aims at introducing in a comparative way the basics of Bulgarian and Greek histories and cultures. The selection of themes, historical sites and artifacts reveals the complex and idiosyncratic Balkan identity as well as the national specificities, which these two neighboring nations have developed for over forty centuries. Conducted in Bulgaria and Greece.

HUM 271 Ideas and Inventions: Making the Modern World
A look at some of the important inventions and ideas of the 19 th century and how they have shaped the modern world. Emphasis is on British ideas and inventions. Topics include the invention of the train and the camera and the ideas of evolution and germ theory. Prerequisite: BIO 110 or CHE 131 or NSC 110 or NSC 120 or PHY 117 or CHE 117. Conducted in London.

HUM 272 March of Remembrance and Hope (one credit hour)
A study of the history of anti-Semitism in Europe and Jewish and Christian theologies for a post-Holocaust world, culminating in a week-long journey to Poland to visit death camps as well as sites of Jewish culture.


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