Course Offerings | Humanities

Division of Humanities

Helen Emmitt (chair), Steve Froehlich, Anthony Haigh, Joan Haigh, Lee Jefferson, Jane Joyce, Ken Keffer, John Kinkade, William Levin, Nathan Link, Mark Lucas, Dan Manheim, Heather Morton, Mark Rasmussen, Milton Reigelman, Rosa Slegers, Philip White, Lisa Williams, Ian Wilson



No major or minor is offered in this program, but elective courses in humanities are offered from time to time on a variety of topics. HUM 110 or 111 and 120 or 121 are required for graduation and are normally taken in the first year.



Humanities Courses

HUM 110 Introduction to Humanities-I
A study of literature, philosophy, and the fine arts in classical Greek and Roman civilization with special attention given to ethical and aesthetic values. Emphasis is placed on writing, analysis, and discussion.

HUM 111 Expository Writing and Humanities-I
(four credit hours)
A variant of HUM 110 designed to provide additional instruction and practice in all forms of expository writing.

HUM 120 Introduction to Humanities-II
A selected study of literature, music, and the fine arts from the medieval period onward, with special attention given to ethical and aesthetic values. Emphasis is placed on writing, analysis, and discussion. Prerequisite: HUM 110 or 111.

HUM 121 Expository Writing and Humanities-II
(four credit hours)
A variant of HUM 120 designed to provide additional instruction and practice in all forms of expository writing. A passing grade in this course satisfies the basic skills requirement in expository writing. Prerequisite: HUM 110 or 111.


Special Topics Offered 2007-2008

HUM 258 Life in Merida
Experiential learning through community projects and language and culture immersion, as encountered in Merida, Mexico, as well as trips outside Merida. In-class lecture, discussion, film viewings, and readings on such diverse topics as the Conquest, the Mexican Corrido, New World realities as reflected in the Latin American short story, and the history of the Yucatan Peninsula.

HUM 269 Elsaß, Alsace or Elsass: Forming a Modern Alsatian Identity
An introduction to the region of Alsace within the greater context of France and, to a lesser extent, that of modern Europe. Students spend three weeks exploring and studying Alsatian
culture: its history, art and architecture, language, cuisine, geography, demographics, and politics. Conducted in Strasbourg.

HUM 278 Cultural History of Central Europe
This course leads students to direct encounters with the cultural history of Central Europe through travel to some of the countries that comprise this region now and have comprised it in the past. Though centered in Germany, visits may also include Austria, Switzerland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia, and Serbia. Emphasis is on extended classroom knowledge through on-site discovery of the geography, urban organization, transportation networks, commerce, and daily life of the area, as well as on discovering ways the past is preserved there, including architecture, museums, palaces and castles, monuments and memorials, and concentration camps.

HUM 279 An Interdisciplinary Exploration of the Arizonan Southwest
From the awe-inspiring majesty of the Grand Canyon to the rugged starkness of the Sonoran Desert , the Arizonan Southwest is a land of enchantment and wonder. Home to indigenous peoples as far back as 10,000 B.C., Arizona provides a fascinating venue for exploring how people adapt to and in turn are transformed by their natural environments. Students engage in an interdisciplinary exploration of three aspects of this region: the indigenous Native American cultures, the natural environment and the arts. Participants should be able to hike 2-3 miles. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.


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