CHEMISTRY 241 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
FALL 2017 SYLLABUS

CATALOG DESCRIPTION
CHE 241 Organic Chemistry-I (four credit hours )

The structure, nomenclature, stereochemistry, and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and alkyl halides are studied. The mechanistic pathways of reactions, methods of synthesis, and spectroscopic determination of structure are also discussed. Laboratory work is required. Prerequisite: a passing grade in CHE 132 or CHE *135. I strongly discourage you from taking this course if you earned a C- or lower in CHE 132 or CHE 135.

OFFICE HOURS AND CONTACT POLICY:  See my schedule below. I am generally available for questions unless I am in lecture, lab, or at lunch. I usually get in at 7 am on MWF and 7:30 am on TR. I leave my office at 7:50 to go to the classroom so I will not be able to help you at the last minute. I am also available for questions in lab when I am not too busy (after the first 45 minutes of lab unless I am lecturing about NMR). If you visit me in lab you must wear appropriate lab attire, including goggles. I eat lunch usually from 11:15-12:15. I will usually be around until 4 pm on MTWR and 3 pm on F. Sometimes I am in the Student Center on Sunday afternoons to answer questions (I'll let you know in advance). Feel free to ask me questions if you see me on an elliptical in Sutcliffe. If you need to contact me during the day, calling my office (238-5415) is usually best. I check my email often while I am at school, but rarely in the evenings or weekends. Please do not try to ask me questions about organic chemistry problems over the phone or by email since it is often too difficult to answer them except in person. If you have an emergency you may call my cell phone (859-319-0341). You should use some common sense when calling my cell phone. Not understanding how to do a homework problem is not an emergency. Missing my class the next day because you are sick is also not an emergency. Please do not text me unless it is an emergency. Be sure that you give me a phone number that you will answer to early in the morning--I will call you if you do not show up in the first five minutes of an exam. Feel free to follow my Twitter feed: @DrJoeWorkman. I will occasionally point you to valuable information and remind you of deadlines and other important events.


MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
8:00-9:00 CHE 241
YOUNG 112
CHE 241 LAB
YOUNG 236
CHE 241
YOUNG 112
CHE 241 LAB
YOUNG 236
CHE 241
YOUNG 112
9:10-10:10
CHE 241
YOUNG 112
CHE 241 LAB
YOUNG 236
CHE 241
YOUNG 112
CHE 241 LAB
YOUNG 236
CHE 241
YOUNG 112
10:20-11:20
OFFICE
CHE 241 LAB
YOUNG 236
OFFICE
CHE 241 LAB
YOUNG 236
OFFICE
11:30-12:30
LUNCH
LUNCH
LUNCH
LUNCH
LUNCH
12:40-1:40
OFFICE
OFFICE
OFFICE
OFFICE
OFFICE
1:50-2:50
OFFICE
OFFICE
OFFICE
OFFICE
OFFICE
3:00-4:00
OFFICE
OFFICE OFFICE or
CHE Program meeting
OFFICE
OFFICE

Please Do NOT Wait for Students to Leave my Office, Just Come In!

 TIPS FOR VISITING MY OFFICE 

TEXTBOOKSOrganic Chemistry, by John McMurry; 8th edition; Brooks/Cole, 2011. (The 9th edition is much more expensive and not necessary). The cost online is $28 used from Amazon.com.  The lab textbook is A Microscale Approach to Organic Laboratory Techniques, by Donald Pavia et al., 5th edition, 2013. The cost online is $100 used from Amazon.com. Centre's bookstore will charge significantly more for these textbooks. The lab schedule is on the Moodle course page. The study guide for the textbook is optional. A copy will be on reserve in the library. You will not need to bring the textbook to class.

GRADING

THREE 1-HOUR EXAMS 50%
FINAL EXAM 20%
HOMEWORK 15%
LABORATORY 15%*
CLASS PARTICIPATION ??%
*You must pass the laboratory in order to pass the course, 10% of each exam will cover laboratory material so lab will count for 25% of your course grade.

APPROXIMATE GRADE SCALES

 
EXAMS
HOMEWORK/LABORATORY
A- to A
84-100
90-100
B- to B+
68-83
80-89
C- to C+
53-67
70-79
D
44-52
60-69
U
0-43
0-59

Please note that the grade scales above are only approximate ones. I will give you regular updates about where you stand in the class. One half of one exam or one quarter of the final exam may be dropped. The exam dates are September 22, October 27, and November 17. The final exam dates are December 6 at 8:30 am (9:10 section) and December 8 at 8:30 am (8:00 section). Make up exams will not be given except under special circumstances. It is your responsibility to make arrangements well in advance if you know you are going to miss an exam (I will send exams with coaches if you have an away competition on the exam day; you need to let me know the time that you are leaving campus). I cannot move the final exam date or time so do not make plans that will cause you to miss the final. Approximately ten percent of each exam will be based on laboratory material. You are encouraged to actively participate in the class. Your grade may be raised or lowered at my discretion due to good or poor class participation. Poor class participation includes unexcused absences, tardiness or sleeping in class. You will be held to the college policies concerning academic honesty. Please review those policies in the Student Handbook. These standards apply to ALL aspects of the course, including lab reports and homework assignments! I will be using turnitin.com for any written assignments. All assignments (including lab reports) that you turn in for this course must be your own original work. If you are taking the course again, you must submit assignments that are unique to this term; you may not turn in work from the first time that you took the course.

COURSE COVERAGE:  The course will follow the textbook very closely. Some topics may be added or deleted. We will attempt to cover Chapters 1-13 in that order in this course. I will generally tell you what pages to read to review what I have gone over in class.

Date Topic
8/27
Review 1.1→1.11 and 2.1→2.8 Before the term starts
8/28 1.12 Drawing Chemical Structures; 2.9 Predicting Acid Base Reactions→2.12 Noncovalent Interactions
8/30 3.1 Functional Groups→3.4 Naming Alkanes
9/1 3.4 Naming Alkanes→3.7 Conformations of Other Alkanes (bring a model of butane to class)
9/4 4.1 Naming Cycloalkanes→4.5 Conformations of Cyclohexane (bring a model of cyclohexane to class)
9/6 4.6 Axial and Equatorial Bonds→4.9 Conformations of Polycyclic Molecules (bring a model of disubstituted cyclohexane to class)
9/8 Conformations Wrap-up; 5.1 Enantiomers→5.3 Optical Activity (bring a tetrahedral carbon with 4 different balls)
9/11 5.4 Pasteur's Discovery→5.7 Meso Compounds
9/13 5.8 Racemic Mixtures→6.1 Kinds of Organic Reactions
9/15 6.2 How Organic Reactions Occur→ 6.4 Polar Reactions
9/18
6.5 A Polar Reaction → 6.6 Using Curved Arrows in Polar Reactions
Exam 1 Material Ends Today
9/20
6.7 Describing a Reaction→6.10 Intermediates
Exam 1 Review at 7:30 pm Olin 124

9/22
Exam 1
9/25 6.11 Biological Reactions→7.3 Naming Alkenes
9/27
7.4 Cis-Trans Isomerism→7.7 Electrophilic Addition
9/29
7.8 Orientation of Electrophilic Addition→7.11 Evidence for the Mechanism
10/2
8.1 Preparing Alkenes→8.3 Halohydrins from Alkenes
10/4
8.4 Hydration of Alkenes→8.5 Hydroboration
10/6
8.6 Reduction of Alkenes→8.9 Addition of Carbenes
10/9
8.10 Radical Addition→8.13 Reaction Stereochemistry
10/11
9.1 Naming Alkynes→9.3 Reactions of Alkynes
10/16
9.4 Hydration of Alkynes→9.7 Alkyne Acidity
10/18
9.8 Alkylation of Acetylide Anions→9.9 Organic Synthesis
10/20
Alkyne and Organic Synthesis Wrap-up
Exam 2 Material Ends Today
10/23
10.1 Properties of Alkyl Halides→10.4 Stability of the Allylic Radical
10/25
10.5 Preparing Alkyl Halides→10.7 Organometallic Coupling
Exam 2 Review at 7:30 pm
Olin 124
10/27
Exam 2
10/30
10.8 Oxidation and Reduction→11.2 The SN2 Reaction
11/1
11.3 Characteristics of the SN2 Reaction→11.5 Characteristics of the SN1 Reaction
11/3
11.6 Biological Substitution Reactions→11.7 Elimination Reactions
11/6
11.8 The E2 Reaction→11.9 The E2 Reaction and Cyclohexane
11/8
11.10 The E1 and E1cB Reactions→11.11 Biological Elimination Reactions
11/10
11.12 A Summary of Reactivity
11/13
Multistep Synthesis Involving Substitution Reactions (extra)
Exam 3 Material Ends Today
11/15

12.1 Mass Spec of Small Molecules→12.4 Mass Spec in Biological Chemistry
Exam 3 Review at 7:30 pm Olin 124

11/17
Exam 3
11/20
12.5 Spectroscopy and the EM Spectrum→12.8 IR Spectra of Common Functional Groups
11/27
13.1 NMR Spectroscopy→13.7 Uses of Carbon-13 NMR
11/29
13.8 Proton NMR→13.13 Uses of Proton NMR
12/1
Combined NMR/IR/Mass Spec Problems
12/6 and 12/8
Final Exam 8:30-11:30 am Dec. 6 for 9:10 section and
8:30-11:30 am Dec. 8 for 8:00 section

ATTENDANCE POLICY: You are strongly encouraged to attend all lectures. Poor attendance (missing classes without an excuse, repeated tardiness or sleeping in class) will affect your class participation grade. You must attend all laboratory meetings: failure to do so will result in possible failure for the course. It is your responsibility to make up labs or other assignments missed due to illness, athletic or other college-approved events. If you miss class it is best to get the notes from someone else in the class, review them and then ask me questions. Do NOT ask for my notes since I seldom follow them in class. If you are too sick to attend class you need to inform me by email before class. I will be relying on your judgement on the severity of your illness since there will no longer be a Parsons Sick List for minor illnesses. If you are too sick to attend an exam or laboratory you must get an excused absence from Parsons or another health care professional. You will not be penalized for any class time, labs, homework or exams missed due to illness. Papers or lab reports may incur a penalty if they are turned in late due to illness. Please do not mislead me about missing class or lab due to illness since that will be considered academic dishonesty and may result in penalties imposed by the Associate Dean or Student Judiciary.

DRESS CODE: I want my classroom to be a somewhat professional environment. To that end, baseball caps and other types of hats may not be worn in my classroom. T-shirts and shorts are OK as long as they are in good shape and of appropriate length (would a man and a woman be comfortable wearing shorts of that length?). I do not want to have a strict dress code, but you should use your common sense about what is appropriate dress. If I do not feel that you are dressed appropriately I will quietly ask to you to leave to change your clothing. Repeated violations of the dress code may result in a grade penalty. Shorts and sandals may not be worn in the laboratory.

COMMUNICATION METHODS AND ETIQUETTE; ELECTRONIC DEVICE POLICY: You should check your email at least once per day because that is how I will generally communicate with the entire class. When you send me an email it is appropriate to address me as "Dr. Workman:" or "Hello Dr. Workman:", but not "Hey". You should also use proper words, grammar, and punctuation. If you send me an email, please use a descriptive subject line. If you are sending me a file, please put your name in the file name. For instance, you may send me a lab report and I will not be able to distinguish it from another student's unless your name is in the filename. Please keep your cell phone OFF in class, lab and my office. It is not polite to be checking your cell phone in my office when I am trying to help you. If you are using your cell phone in lecture or lab I will confiscate it. Cell phones are not allowed on exams. You may use a tablet/laptop in lecture to take notes/draw structures. However, if I notice that you are using it for other purposes you will lose that privilege.

DISABILITIES: I encourage students with disabilities, including but not limited to disabilities such as chronic diseases, learning disabilities, and psychiatric disabilities, and students dealing with other exceptional circumstances, to come see me after class or during office hours so that we can make appropriate accommodations. Also, please be sure to discuss these concerns with Dean Mary Gulley (mary.gulley@centre.edu), the College’s coordinator for disabilities.

EXAMS: Exams will be based primarily on in-class notes, homework problems and material from the laboratory. They will also test you on your ability to apply your knowledge to previously unencountered material. You can get an idea of the types of problems and format by looking at the exams from the last time I taught the class (see Moodle). You should be aware that the material covered for the exams the last time may be different than this year. I will let you know in class which problems are appropriate. I will only answer questions on exams from the spring and fall of 2016. I do not hand back finals so you will not find any old ones. 

HOMEWORK:  Homework problems are available on Moodle as a PDF file (they are different from previous years!).  Problems will be assigned on a daily basis in class and via email/Moodle. Do NOT print out all of the homework pages since I will be continually updating them. Problems from the textbook will also be suggested as homework. Some homework will require you to come up with and solve problems. You must show your work on all problems and cheating is grounds for failure for the course.  Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the designated date:  late homework will not be accepted.

TIPS FOR STUDYING: 

 MOLECULAR MODELS and SOFTWARE:  You should buy a set of these from the bookstore or elsewhere. Very often I will not be able to answer your questions about homework problems if you do not bring a set of molecular models. They may also be used during exams. You will be using ChemDraw to draw structures for lab reports and papers. Download it here (link coming soon).

GENERAL ADVICE:  Students always ask what strategies they should adopt to do well in organic chemistry. Over the years I have collected advice from students who earned A's in both semesters of organic chemistry that you can view here.